Monitor Your Patients
Making Use of Your State’s PDMP
(Prescription Drug Monitoring Program)

The PDMP is an online database which houses prescribing and dispensing data for patients per state. The PDMP helps identify when a patient obtains multiple prescriptions from different practitioners—which may indicate the patient is misusing or addicted to prescription drugs.3,4

US State Prescribing Rates per 100 persons, 20165
>107.1 prescriptions
83.0-107.1 prescriptions
64.1-82.9 prescriptions
<64.1 prescriptions

Learn How to Use Your State’s PDMP
Featuring Daniel P. Alford, MD, MPH, FACP

How Can You Speak With Your Patients About Potential Prescription Medicine Misuse?
How Can You Help?

46 PEOPLE DIE EACH DAY
FROM PRESCRIPTION OPIOIDS IN THE US.6

References
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Opioid Overdose. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/index.html. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  2. The American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) Fact Sheet. American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians website. http://nasper.org/Documents/FactSheet-DrugAbuse-2011.pdf. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  3. State prescription drug monitoring programs. Office of Diversion Control website. http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/faq/rx_monitor.htm. Drug Enforcement Administration website. Updated June 2016. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  4. Prescription drug monitoring frequently asked questions (FAQ). Brandeis University. Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Training and Technical Assistance Center website. http://www.pdmpassist.org/content/prescription-drug-monitoring-frequently-asked-questions-faq. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  5. U.S. State Prescribing Rates, 2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/maps/rxstate2016.html. Updated July 31, 2017. Accessed March 23, 2018.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Prescription Opioid Overdose Data. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/overdose.html. Accessed March 30, 2018.
  7. Why guidelines for primary care providers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/guideline_infographic-a.pdf. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  8. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. Results From the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables. https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015.pdf. Published September 2016. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  9. Hedegaard H, Warner M, Miniño AM. Drug Overdose Deaths in the United States, 1999-2016. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db294.pdf. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Drug Overdose Death Data. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/statedeaths.html. Accessed March 22, 2018.
  11. Jones CM. Heroin use and heroin use risk behaviors among nonmedical users of prescription opioid pain relievers—United States, 2002-2004 and 2008-2010. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013;132(1-2):95-100.

*The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids wishes to acknowledge that this work was supported by the US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, under grant number 2U18FD004593-06. The content is solely the responsibility of the Partnership and does not necessarily represent the official views of the US Food and Drug Administration.